What's Required

  • (c) Eligibility definitions.

     
    (5) Intellectual disability.  A student with an intellectual disability is one who has been determined to meet the criteria for an intellectual disability as stated in 34 CFR, §300.8(c)(6). In meeting the criteria stated in 34 CFR, §300.8(c)(6), a student with an intellectual disability is one who:
     
    (A)  has been determined to have significantly sub-average intellectual functioning as measured by a standardized, individually administered test of cognitive ability in which the overall test score is at least two standard deviations below the mean, when taking into consideration the standard error of measurement of the test; and
     
    (B)  concurrently exhibits deficits in at least two of the following areas of adaptive behavior: communication, self-care, home living, social/interpersonal skills, use of community resources, self-direction, functional academic skills, work, leisure, health, and safety.
     

Definition

  • A student with an intellectual  disability  is one who has been determined  to meet the criteria   for   an   intellectual disability (significantly   subaverage   general   intellectual functioning,  existing  concurrently  with  deficits  in  adaptive  behavior  and  manifested during  the  developmental  period,  that  adversely affects  a  child’s  educational performance)
     
    A student with an intellectual disability is one who
     
    • Has been determined to have significantly sub-average intellectual functioning, as measured by a standardized, individually administered test of cognitive ability in which the overall test score is at least two standard deviations below the mean, when taking into consideration the standard error of measurement  
     
    AND
     
    • Concurrently exhibits deficits in at least two of the following areas of adaptive behavior:
    – Communication
    – Self-care
    – Home living
    – Social/interpersonal skills
    – Use of community resources
    – Self-direction
    – Functional academic skills
    – Work
    – Leisure
    – Health
    – Safety

    The child's deficits are manifested during the developmental period; and by reason of the intellectual disabilities, the child needs special education and related services.

What We Do

  • 1.  The diagnostician must obtain a full scale IQ by using one or more of the following assessment batteries: WISC V, WIPPSI III, ECAD or KABC-II NU.  Obtaining a non-verbal IQ is not required.  
    Note: A full scale IQ of 70 or below is considered more than two standard deviations below the mean.  Always take into consideration the standard error of measurement (SEM) which can be found in the assessment manual. 
     
    2. The diagnostician must obtain a formal measure of adaptive behavior using either the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System III (ABAS III) or the Vineland II.  It is best practice to have both a parent and teacher complete an adaptive behavior rating scale. To ensure a valid measurement of adaptive behavior, the child needs to be with the teacher for at least 4 weeks. A student must have deficits in at least two of the following areas of adaptive behavior: communication, self-care, home living, social/interpersonal skills, use of community resources, self-direction, functional academic skills, work, leisure, health and safety.  Deficits in adaptive behavior should be considered for students who are assessed at a scale score of 5 or below or a standard score of 75 or below.
     
    3. The diagnostician will administer a formal achievement test, such as the KTEA-III, WJ IV Tests of Achievement, or for very young children ECAD. 
     
    4. The diagnostician should always include informal information from teacher, RtI data (if applicable) and observations, as well as district/campus/state assessment data.  

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